I recently did a piece on Victoria falls and it got me thinking, not much has been said about Kenya’s waterfalls….and boy are they beautiful, and stunning, and scenic. Surely worth a visit!

Sheldrick Falls

Located at Shimba Hills National Reserve, Sheldrick Falls is a 21 m high fall with a natural plunge pool.Sheldrick_Falls_03 One can take a guided 2km tour, by KWS rangers, through a forest teeming with elephants and buffaloes and a variety of wildlife, to the falls where you can cool off in the spectacular plunge pool.The guided tours, depending on the time of day can be free or at a fee of Ks.300. Of course, one can trek to the falls unaccompanied, but it is not advisable. Imagine coming face to face with a bull!

Sheldrick falls is named after the famous game warden, David Sheldrick. Some claim David was the first man to discover the falls. Really guys?!

Thomson’s Falls

In 1883, Joseph Thomson, after being the first European to discover it, named the falls for his father.

220px-Thomson's_Falls

Located at the Ewaso Nyiro River, the waterfall is 74 m high. Maybe it has something to do with the waterfalls but, located further upstream is one of Kenya’s biggest hippo pools. Quite a sight I assure you.

 

One can easily board a taxi or take a 1 km walk to the falls from Nyahururu town. Depending on one’s nationality, entry fees to the falls differ: Ksh.100 for Kenyan citizens and residents and Ksh.200 for non residents.398px-Thomson's_Falls1

 

Guided walks are available, or if preferable, armed with a guiding map and a picnic basket, one can tour the falls individually or visit the hippo pools.

 

P.S Don’t antogonise the hippos, they can be quite fast.

 

Fourteen Falls

Located 12 km from Thika town, Fourteen falls is a plunging 27m deep majestic site.The_Fourteen_Falls_02 The fall got it’s name from the 14 small streams (parts of Athi river) that merge to form 14 falls. It is literally a miniature version of Niagra falls, on a very small scale though. Overlooking the falls is the hard to miss Kilimambogo (Hill of Buffaloes).

While there is a lot to do at Fourteen Falls; fishing, boating, photography and bird watching, the experience is greatly limited by the foul smell and garbage polluting the falls.

Chania Falls

Chania falls draws it’s waters from the Chania river. Chania falls can be best viewed from Blue Posts hotel, which was built by colonialists in 1908.chania

 

The well manicured gardens surrounding the falls are not only scenic but offer awesome views for bird watching.

For its photogenic scenery and mystical enchantment, Chania Falls is a must visit.

Karuru and Gura Falls

Karuru and Gura falls are both located in the Aberdares National Park.

karuru 1

Karuru Falls

karuru 2

Aerial view of Karuru Falls

Both waterfalls are situated across the valley from one another. Amazingly or maybe coincidentally, both falls are three-tiered, although all three tiers can only be visible from across the valley, or from the air.

Tana River contributes to the formation of these two awesome waterfalls.

 

While Karuru falls plunges 273m, Gura falls drops 302m   making it the highest and tallest waterfall in Kenya.

gura 2

Gura Falls

gura 1

Aerial view of Gura Falls

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lugard Falls

Lugard falls were named after the first British proconsul of East Africa, Captain Lugard.

lugard 2Lugard falls are weird (in a good way) and visually complex. The rocks around the waterfall are sculptured by the Galana River, making a series of short falls and steep rapids. The falls plunge into a large natural pool below the narrow rocky gorge creating a violent sound that becomes ROARING during the rainy season.

It is a wonderful place to take photos and admire the multi-coloured rocks with strips of grey, white and pink. Located just downstream from the river is Crocodile Park where, you guessed it, crocodiles, and hippopotamus, bask in the sun.

 

 

 

 

Related Posts

  • 38
    Where:  Address: Kazungula, Zambia Height: 355′ Elevation: 2,904′ Watercourse: Zambezi Forms the border between Zambia and Zimbambwe. Facts: Forming the greatest curtain of falling water in the world, it stretches 1708m. 'Discovered' in 1855 by famous missionary, David Livingstone, who named it after Queen Victoria. It is a UNESCO World…
    Tags: falls

Comments

comments